Curious

Do you ever read something, whether it be a blog post, a newspaper article, a book or even just a sign, and begin to wonder… and wonder… and wonder… and wonder… And then you end up on an entirely different, albeit inspired, plane of thinking?

Some may call this an attention problem. I call it an imaginative, developed, and interactive mind.

Let’s go with a shorter description though, coined famous by Olivander from Harry Potter. “Curious.”

Here are a few completely unrelated, but definitely thought-provoking ideas that I’ve come across in the past week or so.

First and foremost, the concept that there are books out there that when paired together, rival the likes of peanut butter and jelly. The Barnes and Noble blog gave a list that I’ll admit I haven’t much of. The post did cause me to think about what books that I have read that I feel would pair well together though.

curious-pbj

I think that The Omnivore’s Dilemma and The Hunger Games would be interesting when read simultaneously.¬†They both bring up the contrast between the more primal/natural method of surviving by hunting ¬†compared to the world that we live in today where we take advantage of/have even distorted how we perceive food.

curious-od-hg

Two other books that come to mind with this metaphor are The BFG and The Little Prince. Both are books that I read when I was much younger, but they both are great in the fact that they explore out-of-the-box thinking and go farther than what’s perceived as possible.

curious-bfg-prince

From that group of thoughts came another. I’ve already shared my love of reading several times. I’ve loved reading ever since Elementary school when I read my first chapter book, Amelia Bedelia. Last Friday in the comments of my post a lot of us chatted about how we really enjoy rereading books. What I personally didn’t differentiate between though was what kind of books I tend to reread.

I guess what I’m getting at is that I mainly only reread books that I’ve acquired in the last 6 or so years. I haven’t reread any books that I read in my “younger days.” I probably would actually enjoy those books immensely. But I’m also scared that I won’t. What if I don’t like them and by rereading them I taint the memory of all of the books that I perceived as being wonderful during my childhood?

Specific books that comes to mind are The Magic Treehouse, Nancy Drew, The Mandie Series, and The Boxcar Children. I highly doubt that I will dislike them if I am actually to read any again. Still, there’s that lingering worry.

curious-children-2

Which brings me to my final loose end of brain activity for tonight- Do you judge people based on reading? Not just what kinds of books they read, but also just on whether they do or don’t read?

curious-who-are-you

I want to say that I don’t, but I’m pretty sure that I do judge people based on that factor of whether or not a person likes books. If I meet someone for the first time and I find out they don’t like to read, I kind of see that as a negative aspect or “weakness.” Sure, they can make it up by being a fan of any of a number of my other favorite obsessions; however I will always feel a special connection to fellow readers.

curious-book-lovers

This post is not at all where I was expecting to go. Mostly I just rambled on about books. Which is just fine by me really.

RIght now I’m going to read another chapter or two of my current reading pleasure and then am off to sleep… Hopefully a dreamless sleep and not one full of faeries, goblins and shapeshifters (does anyone else dream of characters from their current book?).

———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Oh man, I’m so sorry you had to read all of that. It was so boring that as I was adding pictures last night I fell asleep.

Okay, so it’s not THAT boring, as long as you like books.

One last thought to leave you with today. Please tell me you agree.

Layout 1